Dealing with ‘Unusual Attitudes’ Part II

In the last post, I mentioned that aeronautics uses the term ‘attitudes’ to describe a plane’s orientation to flight. The study and practice of dealing with ‘unusual attitudes’ is part of training as a pilot.

Planes have attitude indicators. (see 1. below) Yet, pilots, in the midst of tests of unusual attitudes, often don’t believe their instruments. Surprisingly many end up flying the plane upside down.

In navigating life, so much of learning to function in a social world, interferes with our listening to our inner guidance, it is not uncommon to lose touch. Sensing unusual attitudes should activate, ‘listening to our indicators’, but instead, how often we resist. We ‘fly upside down’, adding to the problem.

Maybe we need some practice in listening to our indicators. Since, not unlike the aforementioned pilots, how much are we able to see our own attitudes, in relation to a larger, more precise or accurate view of the world?

Through the study of seeing in others an unwillingness to consider alternate ideas, we may begin seeing our own ‘unusual attitudes’. That would truly be power. Seeing the speck in our neighbor’s eye is infinitely easier, than to see in one’s self, our unwillingness to change our acquired orientation, often in the face of overwhelming, contradictory information. That may be the most usual attitude towards unusual attitudes that exists.

O sensei said, “Aikido is not for correcting others. It is for correcting the discord in your own mind.”

Now, there is a path with heart, which is why it takes courage.

 

1.) An attitude indicator (AI), also known as gyro horizon or artificial horizon or attitude director indicator (ADI, when it has a Flight Director), is an instrument used in an aircraft to inform the pilot of the orientation of the aircraft relative to Earth’s horizon.

Pitch attitude is the angle formed by the longitudinal axis, and bank attitude is the angle formed by the lateral axis.